You’re Only Human. And That’s OK.

Before we know it, the San Diego Convention Center and surrounding hot spots will be filled with Esri users and staff chatting about maps, apps, cool geo-tools, and innovative ideas for putting them all to creative use. It will be a beautiful thing.

While the managers in attendance will be just as excited as the rest of us, they face a unique challenge. How does one convert creative, tech-fueled ideas into tangible results that benefit the organization?

To start with, executive buy-in is required. Just as important, “people buy-in” is required. People, after all, are an organization’s highest value asset and a manager’s main resource.

New technology brings new processes. In order for technology to deliver the desired results, individuals must adopt and successfully adapt to the new processes.

Tech is cool but the people of tech are even cooler.

Inconveniently, we humans have a strong tendency to resist change. When this tendency is ignored, small projects and ambitious initiatives alike face substantial risk of failure. Fortunately, managers can overcome resistance by proactively preparing their people for change.

Two complementary technical workshops at this year’s conference will explore proven approaches to addressing the people aspect of technology.

Best Practices for Technology Change Management

Tuesday, 21 Jul 2015, 1:30pm – 2:45pm, Room 31 C

Presented by David Schneider, Esri training consultant, change management evangelist, and self-proclaimed weather geek, this session takes a deep dive into best practices and tips to successfully manage technology-driven change. Dave will also share a change-leadership perspective on how the evolution of the ArcGIS platform provides unprecedented opportunities to engage non-traditional GIS users throughout an organization.

Location-Enabling Your Workforce: You Can with a Plan!

Wednesday, 22 Jul 2015, 1:30pm – 2:45pm, Room 31 C

Co-presented by Esri training consultants Andy Spence and Diane Wagner and Jacob Boyle, GIS manager at Seneca Resources Corporation, this session explores the three-phase workforce development planning process. Jacob will share his experience with workforce development planning, and how it is helping him promote adoption of GIS technology and capabilities throughout his organization.

By directly documenting how an organization’s GIS program aligns with business objectives and strategy, a workforce development plan helps managers earn executive respect and excitement around the technology and the knowledge workers who create, manage, and use it.


Making sure your people have the knowledge and skills they need to be successful is key when rolling out new tech.

A workforce development plan is also a valuable change-management tool. Because the plan demonstrates executive commitment to supporting individual success through training and professional development, staff feel more confident and motivated to perform at a high level.

Last but not least, a workforce development plan helps managers feel confident their workforce is prepared to deliver tangible results using the amazing technology coming soon to a device near you.



This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply