Tag Archives: data

City of Tucson Police Department Supports the White House Police Data Initiative

The Tucson Police Department hosted its inaugural Data Sharing Event last weekend in support of the Department’s commitment to the White House Police Data Initiative.  The event provided a collaborative, innovative, and fun approach to gathering and analyzing data from bicycle and pedestrian collisions, and it generated a robust discussion about distracted behavior.  Members from the Tucson Department of Transportation, various Bicycle and Pedestrian Programs, the University of Arizona, civic and social organizations, and other volunteers all participated.

Participants gathered in groups and analyzed redacted reports on the collisions that were in paper format.  Esri’s geoform application was to used capture the paper information and map it quickly.  Attributes identified by reviewing the reports, injuries, and citations were all collected.

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Annual Reporting with Story Maps

By John Steffenson

I’ve written about our work with the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program previously, and perhaps you’ve seen the plenary presentation FIA staff gave at this year’s Esri User Conference. One of FIA’s newer efforts is to update and modernize one of its traditional and perhaps more mundane tasks, producing annual reports. The FIA Program collects extensive information on the nation’s forests and is mandated by the farm bill to produce five-year reports on the status and trends of our forest resources. In the east, FIA has historically also produced an annual report that provides insight into the incremental changes and trends observed in the data collected since the last detailed report. State foresters and industry experts can utilize that information to make policy or investment decisions.

Fifteen years ago, annual reports began as resource bulletins. These previously printed documents are now delivered as PDFs. At the 2016 Society of American Foresters National Convention in Madison, Wisconsin, the FIA Program unveiled 10 FIA annual reports as story maps with interactive maps, charts, and graphs. ”We’ve been producing  annual reports for a long time, but how do we make them more meaningful, not just rote documents? How can we reach new audiences and explore new ideas?” asks Charles “Hobie” Perry, research soil scientist with the U.S. Forest Service Northern Research Station.

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One Last Look at the 2016 Election

By Christian Carlson

The presidential election is happening tomorrow and government workers are preparing for what is expected to be one of the biggest voter turnouts in history.  To support large numbers of voters and increased scrutiny of voting operations, governments are turning to technology more than ever before.   Advances in mobile, web, cloud infrastructure and mobility have combined to deliver new capabilities, new deployment patterns and, indirectly, the increased expectations today’s citizens have for government resources.  When it comes to this year’s election, increased reliance on technology is evident in both social media outreach and applications designed to provide election-day voter support.

Location for Election Support and Transparency

The use of location as a fundamental element of elections support and transparency has been top of mind for me since the 2016 election season kicked into high gear – which now seems like forever ago.  Fortunately, there is good news for governments taking advantage of GIS as they hustle to prepare for November 8.

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Building Innovation in LA

City of Los Angeles GeoHub

Last week Esri attended #LATechSummit. The summit brings together over 900 LA technology companies, investors, incubators and startups. Los Angeles is the third-largest technology startup ecosystem in the US and is home to “Silicon Beach” on the west side of … Continue reading

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GIS Technology Enables Many Uses for Open Data

The tremendous support for open data demonstrated by this President has brought innovation and engagement to government and has been so impactful on citizen engagement.  Esri, the global smart-mapping leader, has been in lock-step with the Administration on all of their Open Data initiatives.  The ease of use of GIS technology has enabled our users to harness the power of open data in such creative ways.  From the City of Fayetteville, North Carolina whose police department opened more than a 100 data sets to their community as a result of the Police Data Initiative,  to DHS announcing HIFLD Open, which provided public access to over 250 datsets to help better prepare for upcoming disasters, to NOAA publishing their National Water Model to answer a call put forth by the White House Water Summit, we are blown away each and every day when we see what our users in the GIS community are able to do with this data.

FEMA and POTUS with HIFLD Mobile Home Park Data on the Esri Map

Photo credit: Pete Souza, White House Photographer

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ArcGIS + Microsoft Power BI = More Bang for Your Buck

By Scott Ball

Starting today Microsoft will be providing a public preview of a free, powerful, Esri-built mapping visual inside Microsoft Power BI. The new visual, ArcGIS Maps for Power BI, will provide a focused set of ArcGIS capabilities in both the cloud and desktop Power BI offerings. With ArcGIS Maps for Power BI you can do more with maps in your BI than ever before:

  • Get your location data on the map in a snap using addresses, standard geographic boundaries (such as postal code, city, or state), or latitude and longitude values. Our industry leading geoenablement services have high accuracy and let you display your locations as points or boundaries (when possible).
  • Get serious with map visualizations. Use the best map visualizations possible to make your case and tell your story.
    • Make your maps easier to read with map themes such as heatmaps or clustering. In areas where you have many points on the map, aggregating the points helps you understand patterns at a glance.
    • View your locations by size, color, or both. Visualize sales data by size while using color to show which sales rep owns the account to quickly identify the rock stars.
    • Control the data classification used to display your points. You know your data, and you know how it should be displayed. Use common statistical classification methods such as natural breaks, equal interval, quantile, or standard deviation to show your data appropriately.
  • Use reference layers to spatially analyze relationships in your data and complement your tabular analysis. A reference layer can help you understand what’s going on in the areas that are important to you. The boundaries of these areas can be used to select your Power BI data and filter the other charts and graphs in your reports and dashboards.
    • Use a demographic reference map such as population growth, median household income, or median disposable income to identify interesting areas.
    • Use community-submitted ArcGIS reference maps to go beyond the basic standard geographies offered in demographic reference maps. A world of community-shared maps is at your fingertips.
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Data Driven Citizenship

No one cares about a neighborhood more than the people who live there. People spend their days and evenings along the street, raise children, foster connections with neighbors, build businesses, grow gardens, bike, walk, and live. A few choose to engage with their civil organizations, advocating for positive change, or against negative impacts; they participate in civic meetings, and some even run for office in order to have a professional responsibility to their community. Our fundamental goal of democracy is to expand the engagement and active participation to every person.

Contemporaneously, the internet has provided a platform for immediate and global access to information and people. An increasing majority of people carry a web integrated, sensor laden, geolocated mobile computer that makes this access ubiquitous and pervasive. Whether merely reading or actively publishing information, we have an unprecedented ability to interact with both our physical and digital worlds in coordination – essentially integrating our neighborhoods with realtime and historical data about us and our communities.

One of the primary roles of government historically has been to gather resources in order to build physical infrastructure such as roads, parks, and buildings such that communities and commerce can grow and flourish. Increasingly, a new role is for government to provide a digital public infrastructure, one which supports access to information, in order to improve the efficiency of government operations as well as enable more meaningful decisions by constituents. More than just websites, new digital services are more responsive, scalable, and optimistically more effective in serving people’s needs. Combined with open data, information analysis tools, and online forums.

Cub Scout Joshua Perry prepares to collect sales information using Collector for ArcGIS.

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Multispectral Imagery in Action

Putting remotely sensed image data to work

Imagery provides more than just plain pictures. Some sensors detect energy beyond what is humanly visible, allowing us to “see” across broad swaths of the electromagnetic spectrum. This enables scientists, geologists, farmers, botanists, and other specialists to examine conditions, events, and activities that would otherwise be hidden. The implications are profound and the applications are seemingly endless.

Expanding your point of view

Every day, the earth is directly imaged from scores of sensors in the sky and from orbit in space. Almost everything that happens is measured, monitored, photographed, and explored by thousands of imaging devices mounted on satellites, aircraft, drones, and robots. Much of this information ends up as imagery that is integrated into a large living, virtual GIS of the world, deployed on the web.

Some of these sensors see beyond what our eyes see, enabling us to view what’s not apparent. Multispectral imagery measures and captures this information about a world that has many more dimensions than just the colors of the rainbow—it sees past the limits of what our eyes perceive.

Nicaragua’s Momotombo Volcano awoke with an explosive eruption in December 2015. This false color image highlights hot areas, primarily the lava flow that extends to the northeast.

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Esri Encourages its Community to Enter the AAPI Data Challenge

Showcase Your Work and Win a Trip to Washington, DC

Esri is getting the word out about an exciting opportunity to create dynamic data solutions for the Department of Education’s Asian American and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) Data Challenge.

We are challenging people to unleash the power of data by way of their own geographic analyses, visualizations, predictive models and more – to tell a compelling story. We believe new ways of exploring and boosting the visibility and utilization of data on AAPIs – helping to make it more meaningful – will inspire better understanding, insight, and action.

The challenge was announced by the White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (WHIAAPI), and AAPIData.com, a research project sponsored by the University of California, Riverside. The initiative’s aim is to improve the quality of life for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders across the nation through increased access to, and participation in, federal programs.

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GIS is Collaborative

Your own GIS is simply your view into the larger system. It’s a two-way street. You consume information that you need from others, and in turn, you feed your information back into the larger ecosystem.

Geography is key for integrating work across communities

Modern GIS is about participation, sharing, and collaboration. As a Web GIS user, you require helpful, ready-to-use information that can be put to work quickly and easily. The GIS user community fulfills that need—that’s the big idea. GIS was actually about open data long before the term gained fashion because the people who were doing it were always looking for ways to deepen and broaden their own GIS data holdings. No one agency, team, or individual user could possibly hope to compile all the themes and geographic extents of data required, so people networked about this to get what they needed.

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