Monthly Archives: November 2015

Location Analysis in IoT and Big Data Telematics

You cannot go to a technology conference these days without hearing about the Internet of Things (IoT).  The consensus is that sensors and information technology will soon be all around us, impacting our daily lives to bring us awareness, efficiency, and safety.

We are already experiencing this change via rapidly growing use of smart technology: smart watches, smart refrigerators, and smart buttons on appliances.


Where Is the Smart Vehicle?

It is difficult to find a phone that is not a smartphone. On the other hand, it is next to impossible to buy an affordable car that is truly a smart vehicle.  Innovative manufacturers such as Tesla, Faraday, and Google are the frontrunners when it comes to information technology implementation, while many of the traditional car companies are still in the slow lane.

Telematics information from cars traveling in the Bay Area, California. The different colors show different speed, red being the fastest. Continue reading

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Imagery: Adding New Perspectives to GIS

Because imagery sees the earth in unique ways, this enables us to both view and analyze our world using multiple perspectives.

At the most basic level, imagery is simply pictures of the earth. Imagery can be immediate or taken across multiple time spans enabling us to measure and monitor change. Every image contains massive amounts of information and can be one of the most immediate ways to collect data.

When it’s integrated with GIS, imagery encompasses a broad collection of data about our world in the form of pictures from above—taken by satellites from space, aircraft flying over our cities, and collected by other sensors. Imagery represents the earth in digital pictures composed of millions of pixels. Satellite and aerial images are geo-referenced pictures that overlay focused areas of our planet. Continue reading

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From Open Data to Data Engagement

Beyond transparency and accountability, the ultimate goal of open government is to empower citizens by providing them with data in a meaningful context. 

The principles of open government and transparency suggest public access to information and, subsequently, scrutiny. Public scrutiny ultimately leads to accountability. Transparency and accountability together empower a public audience to weigh in on issues that matter to them, and provide an opportunity to influence decisions and hold the people making those decisions accountable.

When it comes to opening up GIS data, transparency is often cited as being a key driving factor in making that data available. But simply providing downloads for data is not enough, and in the grand scope of openness is somewhat meaningless. Continue reading

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