Tag: Editing

Labeling Parcel Lines with COGO Dimensions

A parcel map requirements for line dimensions used to be hard to achieve using only labels. This is the reason many user reverted to the use of annotation. But maintaining annotation is labor intensive, designed for a specific scale and prone to user error. Labels, on the other hand, are database driven, can be easily compared with the line’s geometry as part of the QA process and require no maintenance once configured. We spent a few hours configuring the labels for parcel lines and you can see the results below, which are just as good, if not better. This result could have never been achieved without the parcel fabric redundancy of lines and the concept of line-point.
This post can help you configure labels for parcel fabric lines using the standard label engine or the Maplex extension. Even if you are forced to use annotation, you can benefit from this configuration, as labels can easily be converted to annotation. Continue reading

Posted in Editing, Local Government, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Parcel Editing Workflows at ArcGIS 10 – Alley Vacations

Here is a great blog post from the Parcel Editor Team.  Its an overview of the editing workflow you’d go through to vacate an alley in ArcGIS 10.

Alley Vacation – Part 1

The parcel fabric data model lends itself to many improved workflows for managing your parcels, particularly when it is used in conjunction with the Local Government Data Model and Tax Parcel Editing Template for ArcGIS 10, which you can download from the resource center.  Some of these improved workflows are hard to detail in the help, though, so we’re hoping some blogs will help out.  One of these workflows comes from the City and County of Denver and centers on how you perform a vacation of an alley or right-of-way parcel.  The City and County are using the Local Government Data Model, which provides the ability for managing not only parcels, but also Lots and Subdivisions.

There are a few things to consider before performing an alley vacation or creating any new parcel(s). 

1. Does the alley exist in the lot layer?

If the alley exists, the first step before doing any work would be to make sure the original lot (alley) is marked appropriately in the historic layer (marked as Vacation).

2. How accurate are the measurements on the adjacent block edges/lots?

In the data that was used for this example, the lots should be 125 feet by 25 feet, but a look in the parcel description shows the measurements are off for some of the lots.

 

 

The best practice in this case is to re-enter the original blocks by cogo-ing the outer boundary of the block from recording, and then using the Parcel Division tool or Construction to recreate the lots. Once completed, these blocks can be joined to the Fabric using control points or even orthophotography.  Of course, the tax parcels would also have to either recreated from the lots or re-joined to fit the newly constructed lots.

The first workflow listed below can be used for this task.  In a later post, will talk about how to complete this process without recreating the lots.

Recreating Blocks and Lots from Records (original city subs)

1. Mark original lots historic or delete them all together from the Fabric.  In this example, I’ve left this step until the end so that I can use the lots as reference to name the new ones

2. COGO entire block boundary from record.  For this example, all of the lots are 125 X 25.

a. Create a new Plan, and give it an appropriate name.

b. Create a new construction inside that plan, set the parcel template to “lots”

   

 c. COGO the outer boundary like this:

    

Please note that the alley was divided two pieces.  More on that later.  Also note that the original lots are displayed in the background.

d. Delete the 575’ measurement

    

 e. Select the Segmented Line Tool from the top of the Parcel Details window:

     

To start, make sure you cursor is in the FROM cell of the next available row and click in the grid to replace the NW corner, type “23” to get 23 equal segments or right click.

    <img src="http://downloads.esri.com/blogs/arcgisdesktop/alley6.jpg"

 

 

f.   Click the SW corner, and do the same thing for all the other edges.

     <img src="http://downloads.esri.com/blogs/arcgisdesktop/alley7.jpg"

 

g.  Digitize in the connect lot lines, create a connection line for the center of the Alley.

 

3.  Build and Join.  For this example, the parcels are turned off and we joined directly to photography as control.  Later on, the data can be re-adjusted to proper control if desired.

<img src="http://downloads.esri.com/blogs/arcgisdesktop/alley9.jpg" target="_blank"

a. Then create any join links between the existing Parcels and the new lots…make sure to have points turned on for this!

 

b. Hit OK, and the data will now look like this:

  

4. This will make the ROW (Alley) Vacation easier since you now have the centerline of the ROW (Alley) to use to expand the tax parcels.

 a. With the Tax Parcels and just the ROW (Alley) in question selected, we can use the Construct From Parent option to do the rest of the line work.

   

 

b.  We can digitize over the connection lines, creating new lines that extend the current tax parcels.  The Planarize command can be used to get rid of any excess.  We then build to create polygons and merge the smaller vacation leftovers to the current tax parcels, carrying their attributes over to the newly expanded parcel.

 

c.  Finally, mark ROW (Alley) Vacated (Historic).

Content from Larry and Chris (Parcel Editing Team)

 

Posted in Local Government | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Alley Vacation part 2

In a previous post, we talked about how to perform a vacation of an ally or right-of-way parcel using the parcel fabric data model in conjunction with the Local Government Data Model and the Tax Parcel Editing Template from the resource center.  For this post we are going to talk about the same process, but without recreating the original lots.  As with the previous post, we will be working through an example provided by the City and County of Denver.  For this example, the lots currently in the database do not match the legal description (the lots should all be 125 X 25), which is a common occurrence in most databases.

Performing the Vacation without re-creating the original lots
Using the existing lots is the easiest and most straightforward way to go, but not the best-practice.  You could think of this as the quick-and-dirty way to get the tax parcels added and move on with your day.

1. Begin by creating a connection line for the gap between the two disconnected groups.  Use the tool on the Parcel Editor toolbar.  This ensures that a construct from parent process will work, since it requires the group to be connected.

  

2. Use the parcels on the northernmost part of this group, across the gap (alley).  Note the 29’ distance and 87 degree bearing.  The distance measurement should be 30’, with a bearing closer to 90 degrees.  Since we are going with the current set of lots, though, we will simply hit the Apply button to use these numbers.  

   

3. Select just the Tax Parcels that you need to extend to the center of the ROW (Alley) being vacated, right click and select the Construct from parent option.

   

4.Select the Segmented Line Tool at the top of the Parcel Details window.

   

Create a two part segmented line over the top of the connection line that you created.   Take note that the lines as inversed are 14.515ft, not 15.  This is due to the lots/parcels not being repaired prior to the edit.

    

 Note: Be careful, there are two points very close together 81 & 121 in this data.

   

 

5. Same for the southern edge, connecting the midpoints together with another boundary line, to form a centerline running down the middle of the alley/ROW.

   

6. Next step is to create lines across the construction lines used to re-create the ROW (Alley) and the centerline.

a. Start at point 116 as shown here and then place the cursor in the Bearing field

    

b. We want to extend the parcel line along the same bearing, so move the cursor to snap to the tax parcel line that you want to pick up, hold SHIFT and then click to pick up the bearing (this will populate that value in Bearing field).

   

c. Purposely type in something longer than 14.5 (1/2 way point or ROW width)

d. Use the Planarize command to break the line at the centerline.  Select the overlapping piece in the grid, right click and choose the Delete Rows option to remove it.

 

      

7. Continue this process until all the remaining tax parcels have been extended to the ROW (Alley) center and then merge the smaller pieces to you existing tax parcels to get you final output.  In this example, there are no historic ROW parcels created, since they were not there to begin with.

   

 

Content provided by Larry and Chris (Parcel Editing Team)

Posted in Editing, Local Government | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Alley Vacation part 1

The parcel fabric data model lends itself to many improved workflows for managing your parcels, particularly when it is used in conjunction with the Local Government Data Model and Tax Parcel Editing Template for ArcGIS 10, which you can download from the resource center.  Some of these improved workflows are hard to detail in the help, though, so we’re hoping some blogs will help out.  One of these workflows comes from the City and County of Denver and centers on how you perform a vacation of an alley or right-of-way parcel.  The City and County are using the Local Government Data Model, which provides the ability for managing not only parcels, but also Lots and Subdivisions.

There are a few things to consider before performing an
alley vacation or creating any new parcel(s). 

1. Does the alley exist in the lot layer?

If the alley exists, the first step
before doing any work would be to make sure the original lot (alley) is marked appropriately
in the historic layer (marked as Vacation).

2. How accurate are the measurements on the
adjacent block edges/lots?

In the data that was used for this
example, the lots should be 125 feet by 25 feet, but a look in the parcel
description shows the measurements are off for some of the lots.

 

 

The best practice in this case is to
re-enter the original blocks by cogo-ing the outer boundary of the block from
recording, and then using the Parcel Division tool or Construction to recreate
the lots. Once completed, these blocks can be joined to the Fabric using
control points or even orthophotography. 
Of course, the tax parcels would also have to either recreated from the
lots or re-joined to fit the newly constructed lots.

The first workflow listed below can be used
for this task.  In a later post, will
talk about how to complete this process without recreating the lots.

Recreating Blocks and Lots from Records (original city subs)

1. Mark original lots historic or delete them all
together from the Fabric.  In this example,
I’ve left this step until the end so that I can use the lots as reference to
name the new ones

2. COGO entire block boundary from record.  For this example, all of the lots are 125 X
25.

a. Create a new Plan, and give it an appropriate
name.

b. Create a new construction inside that plan, set
the parcel template to “lots”

   

 c. COGO the outer boundary like this:

    

Please note that the alley was divided two pieces.  More on that later.  Also note that the original lots are displayed in the background.

d. Delete the 575’ measurement

    

 e. Select the Segmented Line Tool from the top of the Parcel Details window:

     

To start, make sure you cursor is in the FROM cell of the next available row and click in the grid to replace the NW corner, type “23” to get 23 equal segments or right click.

    <img src="http://downloads.esri.com/blogs/arcgisdesktop/alley6.jpg"

 

 

f.   Click the SW corner, and do the same thing for all the other edges.

     <img src="http://downloads.esri.com/blogs/arcgisdesktop/alley7.jpg"

 

g.  Digitize in the connect lot lines, create a connection line for the center of the Alley.

 

3.  Build and Join.  For this example, the parcels are turned off and we joined directly to photography as control.  Later on, the data can be re-adjusted to proper control if desired.

<img src="http://downloads.esri.com/blogs/arcgisdesktop/alley9.jpg"

a. Then create any join links between the existing Parcels and the new lots…make sure to have points turned on for this!

 

b. Hit OK, and the data will now look like this:

  

 

4. This will make the ROW (Alley) Vacation easier since you now have the centerline of the ROW (Alley) to use to expand the tax parcels.

 a. With the Tax Parcels and just the ROW (Alley) in question selected, we can use the Construct From Parent option to do the rest of the line work.

   

 

b.  We can digitize over the connection lines, creating new lines that extend the current tax parcels.  The Planarize command can be used to get rid of any excess.  We then build to create polygons and merge the smaller vacation leftovers to the current tax parcels, carrying their attributes over to the newly expanded parcel.

 

 

c.  Finally, mark ROW (Alley) Vacated (Historic).

Content from Larry and Chris (Parcel Editing Team)

 

Posted in Editing, Local Government | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Campus Maps and Apps added to ArcGIS for Local Government

Recently, we added the Campus Editing and Campus
Basemap
templates to the ArcGIS
for Local Government Gallery and a new ArcGIS for Facilities Group on
ArcGIS.com
.

These Campus maps can be used to capture interior and/or
exterior assets on a university or business campus.  They can also be used by government agencies
to capture these same assets in a downtown, or on a government complex or
military base.  These interior and
exterior assets are the foundation for a variety of desktop, mobile and web
mapping applications deployed to support facilities management, education,
public works, planning, and military business needs.

The Campus Editing template is an ArcMap editing map,
editor extension, and set of editing workflows for managing building, interior
space and related exterior campus data.   It is an editor that can be
used by mapping technicians in a college university, private corporation, or
public works agency to streamline the collection, maintenance and use of asset
information.

 

The Campus Basemap template is an ArcGIS Map
Document that can be used to create a high-resolution, multi-scale (~1:9k to
1:141) basemap for a university, or business campus.  As we mentioned earlier, this basemap can also be used
by government agencies to produce a high-resolution basemap for a downtown,
government complex, or military base. 

 

Stay tuned for future maps and apps that will leverage this
high-resolution data. 

The first application we’ll release is called the Campus
Place Finder. This application will work in concert with the basemap and
editing templates.  Leveraging the new building interior features
incorporated in thee Local Government Information Model FacilitiesStreets
feature dataset, users will be able to search by occupant name or interior
space (e.g., office number) to locate people or places of interest within
campus facilities.

When you’re ready to start using the Campus
Editing map with your data, start by downloading the Local Government
Information Model
schema-only layer package.  It can be used to create the empty
geodatabase you’ll need to migrate your facilities data and publish these
campus maps.

Posted in Local Government | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

What makes up Production Mapping?

In a previous blog topic we provided an introduction to Esri Production Mapping and its benefits. Now that you know what sorts of organizational challenges are solved by using Production Mapping, let’s talk about some of the key capabilities that allow you to produce high quality geospatial data and maps faster and with fewer resources.

We all know that a generic production workflow consists of four main stages – collecting, editing/updating, reviewing data, and producing the final output (which may be data in another format or cartographic products). While ArcGIS provides a number of tools to produce geospatial data and maps, there are not many tools to automate or standardize the production processes and to ensure consistency and repeatability while also keeping track of work in progress. Esri Production Mapping extends ArcGIS Desktop to support the production stages by providing tools to manage workflows, perform advanced editing and intelligent attribution, ensure data quality, and produce high-end cartographic products. These tools are flexible, allowing you to configure them to suit your industry- or your organization-specific requirements. We hope that providing an overview of the major functionality will help you understand what makes up Esri Production Mapping. Today’s topic will also serve as the starting point for future topics where we will discuss these functionalities in more detail.

Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

What do you want out of an Abandonment Toolset?

If you have not noticed, we have been making a lot of improvements to the Infrastructure Editing Template or IET as some of you have been calling it.  We have been working through the enhancment requests that we recieved at the UC and have released most of them through the Water Utilities Forum Beta Thread.  We have one very important improvement left that we need your help on.  We are looking to build a set of tools to help bring infrastructure from a proposed status to an in-service status and tools to move features from in-service to an abandon status.

Here are the tools we are thinking of so far.

1:  A Geoprocessing script or model to change the status of selected features.

2:  A Geoprocessing script or model to move a feature from one feature class to another and update some attributes.

3:  A tool to select an existing line, select a new line and move all features to the new line(taps and laterals)

4:  A tool to select two locations on a line, junctions or edges, split the line if required, run a trace between them and copy or cut each feature to a new feature class.

Would the above toolset allow you to manage the life cycle of your assets better?  If not, what are we missing?  Should we add any additional steps to these tools?

 Please let us know through the forum entry on this topic linked below.

 http://esriurl.com/3075

 

Thanks

Mike Miller

Posted in Water Utilities | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Editing tips and tricks: Part 2

This is part 2 of tips for editing with ArcGIS 10. This content comes from a User Conference session presented by the Editing Team at the 2011 conference.  For tips 1 – 5 see this this post.

6. Trace edges when cutting polygons.
The current park design is landscaped with shrubs along the entire western border. However, I want the area to be three different types of vegetation, each separated by a foot path. I draw features for the new path lines first so I can use them to split the large polygon. Then, I select the polygon and click the Cut Polygons tool, change the construction method to Trace on the Feature Construction toolbar, and follow along the edge of the overlapping foot path feature. I need to make sure that the trace goes all the way across the polygon so the cut is successful. When I finish the sketch, the polygon is split and its edge exactly matches the shape of the path.

Another method I can use to split the shrub patch polygon by the overlapping foot path line is to snap to the edge of the polygon, right-click directly over the foot path line, click Replace Sketch, and finish the sketch. Replace Sketch pulls the shape of the underlying feature into the sketch used to cut the polygon.

7. Change attributes for multiple features in the Attributes window.
With the shrub patch polygon now split into three features, I want to make two of them flower beds by using the Attributes window to change the landscaping type. To update just two of the three selected polygons, I hold down CTRL and click the feature entries (listed by display expression) at the top of the window, then change their landscaping from Shrub Patch to Flower Bed. If I click the layer name, all selected features are updated; clicking just one feature updates just that feature’s values.

8. Extend lines by sketching with the Continue Feature tool.
The new foot path across the western landscaping needs to be extended eastward across the open space so it connects with another foot path. I can use the Continue Feature tool to extend a line by drawing a sketch. Since the path was digitized from the west originally, I flip the direction of the line so it will be extended toward the east instead. Continue Feature is available starting with ArcGIS 10 Service Pack 2, but must be added to a toolbar from the Customize dialog box because it is not on the default user interface.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9. Use Find Text to provide the text for annotation.
With my park features placed on the map, I want to add some annotation to describe them. To make the text string for a new annotation feature come from the attributes of an existing feature on the map, I can use the Find Text tool on the Annotation Construction window. For example, I click Find Text, click a recreational polygon, and it populates the text box with Athletic Field from the attributes of the polygon. This saves me from typing words manually.


10. Use the Topology toolbar to update multiple features at once.

I want to expand the area of vegetation around the recreational area so it goes closer to the eastern sidewalk of the park. This edge is shared by flower bed polygons, a foot path line, and open space polygons. I can build a map topology to make edits to all these features at the same time, including moving edges, reshaping edges, and modifying the vertices on the edges. I select the shared edge with the Topology Edit tool and use the Reshape Edge tool to update simultaneously all the features that share the common boundary.

The Shared Features window lists which features are part of the selected edge. By default, all shared features are updated when an edge is modified; I can exclude features from edits by unchecking the boxes next to the feature. Once I reshape the edge, the features are still coincident.

If I attempt to perform this edit with the Reshape Feature tool on the Editor toolbar, only one feature is updated at a time and gaps and overlaps will form among my features. With Reshape Edge, they are all modified together. Be sure to use the topology editing tools when making edits to features that share edges.

For the slides from this User Conference session click here.

Content provided by Rhonda from the Editing Team

Posted in Editing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off

Editing tips and tricks: Part 1

At the 2011 Esri International User Conference, I presented a technical workshop about tips and tricks for editing in ArcGIS for Desktop 10 with Matthew Baker. In the session, we integrated time-saving hints into a demonstration of using the editing tools to transform a vacant tract of land into a design for a new city park. In this post, we incorporate some of the top pointers as we continue planning the park by creating and editing foot paths, vegetation, and other land uses.
1. Set layer properties before starting editing.
Prior to my first edit session, I review each layer’s Layer Properties dialog box because these settings determine how layers are displayed and provide properties for feature templates, which are created when I start editing. If I set up my layers ahead of time, it is easier to work with them in the editing environment and means less effort later when authoring feature templates and editing attributes. In particular, I use the Fields tab to turn off fields I don’t need to edit, set aliases, and reorder fields to promote the ones I want to edit first. Next, I look at the Symbology tab to make sure symbols are appropriate and any unique value category labels are descriptive, since feature templates are based on layer symbology. Finally, I go to the Display tab and make sure the display expression is correct, since it is used to represent a feature in the Attributes window, selection chip, table of contents, and other places in ArcGIS. 

One thing to note: if you are reusing this map for publishing with ArcGIS Server, leave the OBJECTID and SHAPE fields turned on because they are used to manage the features in the service.
2. Set a feature template’s default construction tool.
Before I start creating features, I open the Template Properties dialog box and check the default construction tool. Since I need to create curving foot paths through the park, I set the default construction tool to Freehand to make it automatically activate when I choose that feature template. The park needs about a dozen paths and trails created in it, so setting Freehand as the default tool can be a significant time-saver because it avoids the extra click to change from the Polygon tool. By the way, another tip when using the Freehand tool is to press the spacebar to snap to an existing feature.

3. Set a feature template’s default attribute values.
While in the Template Properties dialog box, I also set the default attribute values that will be assigned to the new features created with the template. Since my geodatabase has coded value domains, I can choose the attribute value from a drop-down list. Domains eliminate the need for repeatedly typing the same values (and possibly making a typographic error) and ensure the attribute values are always valid. For the foot path’s feature template, I set the value for the Material field to Wood Chips so features are automatically assigned a material of wood chips.
4. Use the TAB key to move the Feature Construction toolbar.
The Feature Construction mini toolbar is handy because it allows me to change segment types in a sketch, create parallel or perpendicular segments, undo edits, and finish the sketch without moving the mouse to the main Editor toolbar. Since the Feature Construction toolbar follows where I click the map, it can sometimes end up covering where I want to add the next vertex. I can press the TAB key to flip the location of the toolbar so it is out of my way.
5. Type a unit abbreviation to enter values not in map units.
My park data has map units of feet, but I need to enter a length for an athletic field in meters. By including the unit abbreviation of m after the length value, ArcMap knows the value is actually in meters and converts the distance for me behind the scenes. Unit abbreviations only work when the data frame uses a projected coordinate system rather than a geographic coordinate system.
Check back soon for tips 6-10 and for the full slides from this User Conference session click here.
Content provided by Rhonda from the Editing Team
Posted in Editing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off

Sketching the design of a new park

Park analysis and design:  Sketching the design of a new park (part 4)

In my previous blog post, I used a voting application allowing citizens to vote on their favorite location for a park based on choices derived from a suitability analysis. Using ArcGIS Server, their choices went into a database and allowed the parks to be ranked based on their popularity. We have a winner, so now our task is to design the new park. Continue reading

Posted in Analysis & Geoprocessing, Editing | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments Off