Tag: basemaps

Create great basemaps for your community with the Local Government Basemaps Template

This week, we published a new Local Government Basemaps Template for our local government users. This download aggregates a series of local government basemaps previously provided in separate MPKs into a single download. In addition, it adds more recent basemap designs for public safety and planning applications you’ll find on the Resource Center; and mobile basemap designs you’ll need for day-time and night-time field work activities.  In this blog post, we’ll take a close look at the content in the basemaps template and how you can use it to publish great maps for your local government.

The Local Government Basemaps template is a set of ArcGIS Map Documents that can be used to author the essential basemaps in a local government.  The template will help you publish a series of high-quality basemaps using your authoritative content.  These basemaps are the foundation for a variety of desktop, mobile and web mapping applications deployed throughout local government.

The Local Government basemaps provide a consistent geographic context needed across all local government departments and agencies. They provide important reference information that supports daily decision-making. The basemaps orient map users and are typically combined with other map layers that represent operational information managed by a department and/or agency within local government.   In some cases though, the basemaps themselves may serve as a finished product that can be used in a map atlas or other hardcopy product.

The Local Government Basemaps template includes the following basemaps:

General Purpose: Provides context for a wide range of people and supports a variety of application needs within a local government.

Imagery Reference Overlay: Provides road centerline, facility site, and other labels for context when using high-resolution imagery. This reference overlay was designed to be used with a true color imagery basemap.  You can combine the layers in this map with your imagery and created a fused Imagery Hybrid basemap if you so choose.


The Imagery Reference Overlay design provides context for high-resolution true color imagery

Topographic: Provides context for physiographic features and supports a variety of recreational and open space planning needs.

Parcel Public Access: Provides a consumer representation of parcel information that can be used with infrastructure and parcel information. This basemap uses design elements found in the General Purpose basemap but adds additional content at larger scales.

Public Safety: Provides context for public safety data (incidents, events, resources. etc.). This basemap uses design elements found in the General Purpose basemap but emphasizes critical facilities found in a community.


The Public Safety Basemap design emphasizes critical facilities in a community

Mobile Day: Provides context for field workflows and data on a mobile device. This basemap uses design elements found in the General Purpose basemap but has been simplified so features are visible on field devices, in outdoor conditions and during daytime hours.

Mobile Night: Provides context for field workflows and data on a mobile device. This basemap uses design elements found in the General Purpose basemap but has been simplified so features are visible on field devices, in outdoor conditions, and at night time.


The Mobile Night Basemap design supports mobile work activities in low light outdoor conditions

Zoning: Provides boundaries of zone districts and included as part of the zoning ordinance. At smaller scales, this basemap aggregates individual zoning categories into general patterns that identify trends in a given community.

Current Land Use: Provides a description of how land is occupied or utilized. At smaller scales, this basemap aggregates individual land use categories into general patterns that identify trends in a given community.

Future Land Use: Provides a description of how land should be used in the future. At smaller scales, this basemap aggregates individual land use categories into general patterns that identify trends in a given community.

The Future Land Use Basemap design shows land use trends at small scales and parcel level designations at larger scales 

Each basemap is encapsulated in its own unique map document and organized around the scale ranges defined in the Microsoft Virtual Earth/Google Maps tiling scheme for ArcGIS Server.  The data frame in each map document is re-projected to the Web Mercator Auxiliary Sphere Projection (WKID 102100 / 3857) but the source data in the geodatabase is maintained in its local State Plane Projection.  Structuring the TOC by scaled group layers allows you to save layer files that contain all data sources, symbology, and label classes required for each scale level. This can be helpful when resolving cartographic issues found in the cached map at specific scales.

All of the Local Government basemaps use a single information model called the LocalGovernment.gdb. The Local Government Information Model at ArcGIS 10 supports a series of maps and apps used by local governments and demonstrates how ArcGIS can be configured to support specific business needs in your organization.  It reflects specific application requirements and the cartographic requirements necessary to produce rich, multi-scale base maps and operational layers.   You can download the information model from ArcGIS.com and migrate your content into this geodatabase design.  When you do, you can quickly take advantage of the maps and apps published on the Local Government Resource Center.  

You can use the content provided in this template to produce the local government basemaps with your own data.  Once you have created your own geodatabase, you can load data and connect the maps to your geodatabase to make this and other templates work with your data. If you’re responsible for implementing GIS in your community, the Local Government Basemaps Template and sample data from the City of Naperville, Illinois is a good example of the work required to build local government GIS data and related basemaps.

We look forward to your feedback and hope to see great basemaps for your community online soon.

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New Releases of Land Records Maps and Apps Now Available

Over the last few days, we’ve updated several Land Records apps on the Local Government Resource Center.  In summary, these updates include:

Tax Parcel Editing for ArcGIS 10 (v.2.0)

New Functionality

1.    Added the Parcel Editor Utilities Add-In along with related source code and documentation

2.    Added the most recent Local Government Information Model and schema-only layer package

3.    Added a Parcel History Group Layer and associated feature templates to the Editing Map

4.    Added an Encumbrance layer and associated feature templates to the Editing Map

5.    Added a Data Dictionary and Editing Map documentation

Resolved Problems

1.    Resolved several issues with the sample data to correct problems with public and prescriptive right of ways

2.    Resolved several issues with the Bookmarks in the Editing Map

Tax Parcel Viewer for ArcGIS 10 (v.2.0)

New Functionality

1.    Added Data Dictionary and map document (.mxd) documentation

2.    Added ArcMap map service definitions and updated caching instructions

3.    Added support for Internet Explorer 8

4.    Added support for field aliases in the Tax Parcel Query map service

Resolved Problems

1.    Resolved issue with basemap display that occurred when a parcel was selected from the results table

Value Analysis Dashboard for ArcGIS 10 (v.2.0)

New Functionality

1.    Added Data Dictionary and map document (.mxd) documentation

2.    Added ArcMap map service definitions and updated caching instructions

3.    Added support for the ArcGIS Viewer for Flex v. 2.2

4.    Added support for field aliases in the Tax Parcel Query map service

5.    Added support for a multi-layer feature popup

6.    Added support for time-aware sales and foreclosure information

As always, we encourage you to download the Land Records apps and give them a try. When you do, let us know what you think.

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Kick off 2011 with the Local Government Resource Center Webinar

On February 2, 2011 at 1:00pm EST, we’ll be hosting a
webinar that explores the Local Government Resource Center and the maps and apps you can download and configure in your organization.

You can sign up for the
webinar here.

During the 90 minute webinar, we’ll provide an overview of the maps and apps available on the Resource Center and how they can save your organization time and money, help you publish great maps, and simplify your GIS implementation.  In addition, we’ll discuss how you can actively participate in this community and guide future work on the Resource Center.

We look forward to your participation and feedback in 2011.

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ArcGIS Online World Street Map Updated

The World Street Map (World_Street_Map) was recently updated to include more recent street data, enhanced cartography, and additional coverage and levels of detail.

The map was updated as indicated at the following scales:

  • 1:577,000 to 1:144,000: All areas except Antarctica
  • 1:72,000 to 1:18,000: United States including Puerto Rico, Hong Kong including Macao, Canada, Europe, and populated areas in Mexico
  • 1:9,000: United States, Hong Kong including Macao, Canada, Mexico, and Western Europe
  • 1:4,500: United States, Hong Kong including Macao, Europe, and Mexico

The map includes the following updates and enhancements:

  • Over 90 million parcels were addedin the United States
  • Expanded coverage of building footprints was added in the United States and Europe
  • One way street arrows were added for North America and Europe
  • Highway exit labels were added for North America and Europe
  • 30 meter resolution shaded relief for Canada and Europe that extends to 80° North (replacing 90M to 60° N)
  • AND Mapping data was removed from the mid-scales worldwide and in Europe
  • Data from DeLorme was added at the mid-scales outside of North America and Europe
  • Tele Atlas data was added at the mid-scales in Europe
  • Large scale Tele Atlas coverage was extended into more Eastern European countries
  • A large number of offensive physical features names were removed from the United States
  • Large scale coverage was expanded for Canada
  • Incomplete and French language street names in Canada were corrected

If you have previously used this service, you may need to clear your cache in order to see the updates.

If you have feedback or comments about the updates, please post them in the ArcGIS Online forums.

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Using ArcGIS Online basemap gallery in your custom JS apps

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CNN: Social media, situational awareness, and ArcGIS Online

A recently published CNN article talks about the importance of social media, with a focus onTwitter, for obtaining rapid situational awareness about events. The article includes a link to an Esri application for first responders which uses ArcGIS Online basemaps as the foundation for placing tweets and other social media sources in context.

Russ Johnson, Esri’s emergency response industry manager notes in the article: “The data is really unstructured — when you wrap it around a map suddenly you have a micro and a macro view. All of a sudden social media is a really relevant piece of data that can increase situational awareness.”

The app is written using the ArcGIS API for JavaScript and leverages the ArcGIS Online world topographic, world streets, and world imagery basemaps. We agree that these basemaps provide an excellent substrate to provide greater context for social media sources. Shown below is a photo from Flickr that’s been placed on the map via a live feed, and also locations of YouTube videos and tweets.

You can read more about how this application was created and how the various components were brought together by viewing the detailed description.

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ArcGIS Online basemaps and the Data.gov GEO Viewer

At the Gov 2.0 Summit last week we demonstrated how ArcGIS Online basemaps are being leveraged in the new Data.gov GEO Viewer. We’ve had a few questions about the Viewer, so here’s how to find and use it, along with a few details about how it works. Esri’s Marten Hogeweg also covered the GEO Viewer in a post on his blog.

Data.gov, according to Wikipedia, is a U.S. government website launched in late May 2009 by the Federal Chief Information Officer (CIO) of the United States. The site states the purpose of Data.gov is to increase public access to high value, machine readable datasets generated by the Executive Branch of the Federal Government.

The Data.gov GEO Viewer is a fairly recent addition, and is detailed in What’s New at the site. What’s interesting about the GEO Viewer is that it leverages ArcGIS Online basemaps (of which the world topographic basemap is composed chiefly of government-provided data from federal, state, and local government organizations) and it access the data on-the-fly from it’s URL source as catalogued at Data.gov. The GEO Viewer supports ArcGIS services, WMS, GeoRSS feeds, KML/Z files, as well as shapefiles.

You’ll find more information about the app at the GEO Viewer information page where you’ll also find some example data sets you can view. Click one of the preview links to use the GEO Viewer - we’ve chosen the EPA Region 1 regulated facilities in the following example:

The data will be retrieved, and you’ll have an opportunity to select colors to view the facilities:

The GEO Viewer lets you choose from the ArcGIS Online World Topographic, World Imagery, or World Streets basemaps, with the default the topographic basemap.

 

We’ve zoomed in to an area in downtown Boston, and you can see the detailed content that’s been recently contributed by the City of Boston via the community maps program. This provides detailed context for the locations of the facilities, which can be clicked to retrieve additional information.

Going back to the main Data.gov site we’ve entered the seach keyword “copper”

Finding a match for world copper smelters and following the link to its data summary page, you’ll find preview buttons which will open the data in the GEO Viewer.

And here’s the world copper smelter data viewed overlain on the world topographic basemap.

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Free Community Maps Program Webinar on Thursday, August 19

Through the Community Maps Program Esri is collaborating with user organizations around the world to build cartographically uniform and highly detailed global basemaps that GIS users can freely access for their projects.

Community-built basemaps reduce the cost of making data widely available and offer a reliable way to access critical information for use during disasters and other emergencies. Many organizations have already contributed their authoritative content to one of the three community basemaps: World Topographic Map, World Street Map or World Imagery. These maps are hosted and maintained by Esri as part of ArcGIS Online content and can be freely accessed through ArcGIS Desktop, a mobile or browser-based application, or for developers, through the free ArcGIS Web Mapping APIs.

Learn more by attending a free webinar on Thursday, August 19, 2010 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM EDT, and learn how organizations around the world benefit by contributing their data. Just like access to the community basemaps, the webinar is free – all you need to do is register.

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Implementing the Local Government Information Model with ArcGIS 10

At ArcGIS 10, geodatabase designs can be shared with a new type of layer package called a schema-only layer package.  As the name implies, a schema-only layer package contains the schema of the data it references.  It can then be used as a template for populating your data and using the layer properties, such as symbology, scale, etc. provided in a map document.

The Local Government Information Model at ArcGIS 10 supports a series of maps and apps used by local governments and demonstrates how ArcGIS can be configured to support specific business needs in your organization.  It incorporates specific application requirements and the cartographic design elements necessary to produce rich, multi-scale base maps and operational layers.   You can download the Local Government Information Model from ArcGIS.com and migrate your content into this geodatabase design.  When you do, you can quickly take advantage of the maps and apps published on the Local Government Resource Center.  This blog post will show you how to use the new schema-only layer package provided for our local government users.

In ArcMap, click on File>ArcGIS Online and then search Maps and Data for the keyword “local government”.  When you find the Local Government Information Model, you can review the item Details and when you’re ready to download it, just click Add.

You can then determine which geodatabase you’d like to import the schema in to.  The default location is your Default.gdb, but you can specify another empty geodatabase you’ve created if you’d like.  When you download one of the templates on the Local Government Resource Center, you’ll notice we have named the sample geodatabase “Local Government” and all the maps we’re publishing will work with a geodatabase named this. So you may want to think about creating your own LocalGovernment.gdb. 

This is also a good time to to specify the spatial reference for the new geodatabase you’re creating.  A real simple way to do this is to select Spatial Reference>Other>Import and then pick an existing feature dataset that has the correct spatial reference for your data.  Then click Ok, and Ok again, and the import will begin.

When the Import Schema Package tool completes, you will see a series of layers in your map document and an empty schema in the geodatabase you specified.  From here, you can review the descriptions and domains for each feature and begin thinking about how you can migrate your data to this information model.  One note, you’ll have to add your imagery and surface models manually to this schema.

Using this information model makes it very easy to implement the maps and apps on the Local Government Resource Center.  We’ll be adding content to this information model as we publish additional templates for our local government users, so keep an eye out for updates.

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What’s New on the Local Government Resource Center

Over the last month, we’ve been doing a lot of work on the new Local Government Resource Center. Content from http://resources.esri.com has been migrated to a series of new ArcGIS.com groups and we’ve released several new maps and apps for ArcGIS 10.   So let’s take a look at the new Resource Center and the content you can now find to help you implement ArcGIS in your local government.
The Local Government Resource Center
The Local Government Resource Center consolidates several industry-focused Resource Centers (Water Utilities, Public Works, Land Records, and Public Safety) into a single resource for our local government users.   And while we’ve organized this Resource Center around a larger local government GIS system, users who are interested in specific industries, or domains, within local government can still get focused content to help them implement ArcGIS.
 
 
 
In addition to the industries we supported previously, the new Resource Center also has a site dedicated to base maps.  It provides a series of map templates to help you publish high-quality base maps using your authoritative content. These maps support a variety of local government applications you’ll find in the local government galleries. 
 
Finally, we also added two additional sites to support Elections and Planning and Development users. These sites, along with the maps and apps that support them, are still under development. But this should give you a good hint about what we’ll be working on later this summer…. 
Integration with ArcGIS.com
The biggest change you’ll notice on the new Resource Center is the integration with ArcGIS.com.  If you click on a gallery you’ll be sent to an ArcGIS.com Group for that specific industry.  
 
 
The new ArcGIS.com groups contain a series of maps and apps that support the work you do in local government. You’ll find maps and apps from the ArcGIS 9.3 Resource Center Galleries and new ones for ArcGIS 10. Each map and app is organized into a template that you can download and configure in your own organization.  If you’re interested in one of the base maps or web apps, you can try a live version of the template before downloading the zip file and configuring it.
New Content for ArcGIS 10     
There is a lot of new content on the Local Government Resource Center that will help you configure and use ArcGIS 10.  Here is a summary of what you’ll find:
New Apps: An Infrastructure Operations Dashboard and Value Analysis Dashboard that uses the ArcGIS Viewer for Flex; and a Service Request application that can be used to engage your constituents.  
New Maps: Map packages and web maps for general purpose, imagery hybrid, topographic and parcel base maps; along with a series of new maps for operational information used by water utilities, public works, and land records organizations.
 
So that’s a quick overview of the new Local Government Resource Center.  As you take a closer look at the new Resource Center and ArcGIS.com groups, you’ll find several ways to engage teams at ESRI responsible for supporting local government.  There are several blogs you can participate in, and you can interact directly with us on Twitter.  Give us your feedback on the new Resource Center and the maps and apps on ArcGIS.com.  We want to hear how we can help you configure and use ArcGIS in your local government agency.
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