Category: Python

ArcGIS 10 (Desktop, Engine, Server) Service Pack 3

ArcGIS
10.0 Service Pack 3 is now available to download via the ArcGIS
Resource Center

Here is the link to SP 3 for ArcGIS 10 (Desktop, Engine, Server)

Posted in Analysis & Geoprocessing, Developer, Editing, Geodata, Imagery, Mapping, Python, Spatial Statistics | Tagged , , , , , | 9 Comments

New Resources Available for Getting started with Python Map Automation

ArcGIS 10 provides a new Python
mapping module (arcpy.mapping) that allows you to interact with the contents of
map documents and layer files without necessarily needing to interactively open an
ArcMap session.  The methods, properties and functions available in this
new map scripting API enable you, for example, to automate changing data
sources, modify layer properties, export and print maps, as well as automate the
creation of
thematic maps and map series.  Because the new mapping module is part of
the ArcPy geoprocessing framework, scripts can be used within ArcGIS Desktop
but can also be published to ArcGIS Server as geoprocessing services making
it much easier to make mapping and printing capabilities available on the
server.

The following links are resources
that will help you learn more about arcpy.mapping, get access to popular
sample scripts available for download, and
links to new training resources:

Help Resources

  • A new Introduction to
    arcpy.mapping
    help topic is a great starting point. It includes
    links to a new arcpy.mapping tutorial and general guidelines for working with
    arcpy.mapping. ArcGIS Desktop help has a complete section
    dedicated to the ArcPy mapping module. Embedded within the help topics
    are over 100 different, practical help samples that can be copied/pasted into your applications. Be
    sure to review the “Best ways to get started” section.

Sample Applications

  • Approximately 20
    script tools
    that perform routine map and layer management tasks, printing and
    exporting, as well as basic cartographic operations.
    This is an excellent download because it
    includes many practical code samples that perform a variety of tasks and they
    are easy enough to modify for your own purposes.
  • A script
    tool
    that combines Data Driven Pages, arcpy.mapping, and the ReportLab site package to generate a reference map book that includes street index
    pages. It demonstrates how arcpy.mapping can be used to extend Data
    Driven Pages capabilities.
  • A script
    that incorporates Data Driven Pages and arcpy.mapping to build a map series
    that includes dynamic graphic tables. There is a very complete README.doc file
    included with the download that also addresses other useful tips and tricks
    that go along with the application.

 Web Courses

  • Basics of Python (for ArcGIS 10).
    This course teaches fundamental concepts you need to know to create
    Python scripts in ArcGIS. You will learn guidelines for proper Python syntax,
    techniques to troubleshoot common errors, and how to use loops to test for
    conditions and execute different code based on the result.
  • Python Scripting for Map Automation in
    ArcGIS 10
    .
    This course teaches how to automate map production and
    related data management tasks that would be time-consuming and tedious to
    perform manually. You will learn how to work with the mapping module of the
    ArcPy site package to quickly and easily update map layers and map document
    properties, modify map content, and produce individual maps and map books.

 Special thanks to David from the Mapping Team for sharing these links.

Posted in Developer, Python | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Creating Map Books using Data Driven Pages

A few weeks ago, thousands watched a live training seminar on the new Data Driven Pages in ArcGIS 10.  If you missed this excellent live seminar you can watch it on demand from Esri Training.

Description
Using the ArcGIS 10 Data Driven Pages feature, you can quickly and easily create a professional-quality map book from a single map document. This seminar teaches the workflow for using Data Driven Pages. The presenter also covers how to create an index layer from a feature layer and add dynamic text and locator maps to your map pages.

Who Should Attend
GIS professionals and cartographers working in utilities, transportation, public safety, and government mapping agencies and others who need to produce map books.

Key Points
The presenter discusses

  • Data Driven Pages, map books, index feature extents, and geoprocessing tools.
  • The process for building map books.
  • Updating, printing, and exporting map books.

 http://training.esri.com/gateway/index.cfm?fa=catalog.webCourseDetail&courseid=2152

Posted in Developer, Mapping, Python | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

PyScripter — free Python IDE

There’s a new freeware Python IDE that’s grabbing our attention. It’s called PyScripter and you can download it here:

 http://code.google.com/p/pyscripter/

For more information on Python IDEs, see the blog post Review of IDEs for Python

Posted in Analysis & Geoprocessing, Python | Tagged | 8 Comments

Review of IDEs for Python

A common question we get from our Python user community is “which Python IDE is best?” or “which IDE do you guys use?” The answer we’ve given over the years has varied depending on whom you asked and the evolving Python IDE landscape.

We at Esri haven’t had the time to do a review of what’s out there but since we know a lot of you are interested in this topic, you may want to read the infoworld article: “Nine fine Python development tools” http://www.infoworld.com/d/developer-world/infoworld-review-nine-fine-python-development-tools-374

Kudos to Jason Scheirer for finding this article, Ghislain Prince for writing the post, David Wynne for pointing out that I had misspelled Ghislain’s name in the first post, and Ghislain for pointing out that he didn’t actually find the article, Jason did, and he (Ghislain) only forwarded me the email from Jason after adding the blog post details, but David didn’t know that when he caught the original misspelling.  My goal this week is to make this note longer than the actual post…

Posted in Analysis & Geoprocessing, Python | Tagged , | 9 Comments